Debt to Equity

Indicator Description

High Debt to Equity ratio typically indicates that a firm has been borrowing aggressively to finance its growth and as a result may experience a burden of additional interest expense. This may reduce earnings or future growth. On the other hand a small D/E ratio may indicate that a company is not taking enough advantage from financial leverage. Debt to Equity ratio measures how the company is leveraging borrowing against the capital invested by the owners.

D/E 
 = 
Total Debt 
Total Equity 

Debt to Equity is calculated by dividing the Total Debt of a company by its Equity. If the debt exceeds equity of a company, then the creditors have more stakes in a firm than the stockholders. In other words, Debt to Equity ratio provides analysts with insights about composition of both equity and debt, and its influence on the valuation of the company.

Debt to Equity In A Nutshell

This is a measure of risk many people use in their research to gauge how leveraged the company is and if there is risk by having too much debt on their books. For a quick understanding, the higher the number the more debt the company has on the books and this could be the cause of growth or stress. The lower the number, the less debt the company has and is not as leveraged, meaning they do not owe substantial sums of money.

Debt to equity is a measure used to compare the financials of a company to others within the same industry along with measuring its leverage. This is calculated by taking the companies debt and dividing it by the equity in the company, giving you a number expressed in a percentage.

Closer Look at Debt to Equity

Taking is a step further, some of the reasons you may not want to invest in a company that has a high debt to equity number is if the markets begin to slow and sales are affected, they may not be able to pay back their loans, leading to a possible bankruptcy. Secondly, if the number is high, they may be depending on lending to keep cash flow healthy, which is not a sustainable growth model.

On the other side, if the number is low, this means they are not leveraged and are either doing well enough to not need debt or lenders may not lend to them. You will have to research this because the answer would dictate where you go from there. A little debt is alright, but you do not want the company to be over leveraged.

Another way to use this ratio is to compare it to others within the same industry, that way you can see the average of the whole industry. If it is too leveraged, you may look elsewhere within the industry to give you less risk and more value for your dollar.

This is typically one of the most widely used ratios and should be at the front of your fundamental research tool kit. Be sure to look under the hood and find what is driving the result of your equation because there may be more than just the number. Remember that this takes in data and no human emotion, so if you get a feel the company is going one direction, take that into account to help give you a well rounded opinion before jumping into an investment.

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Analyzing currently trending equities could be an opportunity to develop a better portfolio based on different market momentums that they can trigger. Utilizing the top trending stocks is also useful when creating a market-neutral strategy or pair trading technique involving a short or a long position in a currently trending equity.

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